Is All Church Growth Good?

Medical Doctor Phillip Mills writes about the infatuation many have with some popular church growth approaches. Certainly we can question whether it is God’s intention that every church turn into a Mega Church, which I sincerely doubt. But what Mills does is question whether we are worrying about the quality of growth as much as the quantity of growth.

Some have talked about this when speaking about the retention rates or the spiritual growth of those who join. It is problematic when we equate success to putting church hoppers in seats while the total number of members of the Kingdom remains the same in the city. We simply shuffle the church folk from one church to the new church with the big choir and the great preacher. Mills addresses these issues in a helpful way from a physician’s point of view.

Different Ways To Grow

© japolia - Fotolia.com

© japolia – Fotolia.com

Mills notes that there are many ways to grow physically that are not good or healthy. For example, there is Girth Growth. This is where our midsection’s simply grow out. This is not “fitness but fatness.” Could our desire to placate to the whims of the unconverted produce people who simply want what they want rather than desire the transforming power of God? Is it valuable to have a church full of consumers of our religious entertainment?

Girth growth happens when we simply want people in the seats at all costs. We don’t train them as we should. We don’t love them as we should. We don’t strengthen them as we should. And we don’t expect them to use their gifts for the kingdom as we should. We just are happy with more “behinds in the seats.”

Another means of growth, spoken of by Mills, is Forced Growth. This happens when you grow out of balance. This is like when some weightlifters grow their muscle by any means necessary, without doing the other things that are necessary for health. In our religious life, we can do this by ignoring certain fundamentals that we all need to hear as Christians. When we emphasize justification, love, and salvation, but don’t also emphasize justice, sanctification, and the necessary works that a Christ produced life will bring.

Another type of growth is Neoplastic Growth. Cancer is a growth. We don’t want it, we shouldn’t want it, but some growths are cancers. They often grow fast. They take over good tissue and cause great problems. We can have such growth in our churches when we have more and more members who are not producing. We may grow fast, but what good has it done?

Stature growth is another type of growth. This is the true growth that comes when we are true followers of the most high. When we seek to teach the full counsel of God and growth happens. It is important to note, that not all churches will become mega churches, but they can all grow into the measure of Christ. That is our goal.

In the end, we must recognize that all churches are not supposed to become 20K bohemouths. We need to get out of the trap of thinking that the success of the Kingdom is gagged by simply the number of people sitting in front of us when we preach. In addition, we need to see our movement as being more than our local congregation and see it as a integral part of God’s Kingdom movement. Next, we need to stop judging our ministers and our people by measures that will simply promote some of these unhealthy kinds of growth.

Comments

comments

Sherman Haywood Cox II is the director of Soul Preaching. He holds the M.Div with an emphasis in Homiletics and a M.S. in Computer Science.

Tagged with:
Posted in blog, Issues, Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Become A Supporter – Click For Info
Revised Common Lectionary
Transfiguration Sunday (February 26, 2017)
  • OT: Exodus 24:12-18
  • Psalm: Psalm 2 or Psalm 99
  • Epistle: 2 Peter 1:16-21
  • Gospel: Matthew 17:1-9
Af Am Heritage Lectionary
Articles Can Be Found
Featured Blogger on ChurchLeaders.com
Featured Blogger on ChurchLeaders.com
Subscribe Here

Follow Us on Twitter Click Here