Your Sermon Stories Should Have A Point

“I have a good idea, the next time you tell a story…”

“Have a Point!!!”

Steve Martin’s character said to John Candy’s character on the movie Planes, Trains, and Automobiles.

Candy’s character always told stories. And these stories just angered Martin’s character because he saw no point and no value to the story.

Preachers can learn from this fictional interaction. Preachers, if you tell a story, please have a point!

Don’t just tell a story for a shout. Don’t just tell a story for a tear. Don’t just tell a story to elicit emotion.

No, your stories should have a point. And your stories should support and promote the main point of the sermon.

If you don’t do this, you will have people either ignoring the point of your sermon, and/or ignoring the point of your story. Or worst of all, ignoring you altogether.

How can you ensure that your stories are valid and supportive of your sermon? By following a full homiletic approach you will ensure an effective sermon. My method is by no means the only one, but if you want to check it out, head on over to



Sherman Haywood Cox II is the director of Soul Preaching. He holds the M.Div with an emphasis in Homiletics and a M.S. in Computer Science.

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